Zuckerberg-Funded Nonprofits Spent $51 Million on Elections in Georgia

, Zuckerberg-Funded Nonprofits Spent $51 Million on Elections in Georgia, Nzuchi Times Breitbart

Two Mark Zuckerberg-funded nonprofits combined to spend $51 million in the state of Georgia on the November 3, 2020 general election and the January 5, 2021 U.S. Senate runoff elections in that state, according to two separate reports: one published by the Foundation for Government Accountability (FGA), and the second published by one of the Zuckerberg-funded nonprofits.

As Breitbart News reported:

Private funding of election administration was virtually unknown in the American political system until the 2020 presidential election, when Facebook CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan donated $350 million to the Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL), which provided funding to county and municipal governments around the country for election administration, and $69 million to the Center for Election Innovation and Research (CEIR), which provided funding to 23 state governments, primarily through the Secretary of State’s office, also for the funding of election administration.

More than 12 percent of the estimated $419 million Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan gave to the CTCL and CEIR in 2020 was spent in the state of Georgia, even though the state has only 3.2 percent of the country’s population. (Note: Georgia’s population in 2020, according to Census Bureau estimates released in April 2021 was 10.7 million, which is 3.2 percent of the Census Bureau’s estimate released of the United States 2020 population of 331.1 million.)

The Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL) spent $31 million in 40 counties in the November 3, 2020 general election, and an additional $14.5 million in 15 counties for the January 5, 2021 runoff election, according to a May 2021 report from the FGA.

Another Zuckerberg-funded group, the Center for Election Innovation and Research (CEIR), provided more than $5.5 million in funding for the November 3, 2020 general election directly to the office of Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, according to a March 2021 CEIR report:

Georgia used CEIR grant funds in both the November general election and January runoff election to encourage voters to apply for a ballot online. This approach sped up the process for both voters and election officials while also making it easier to track application status. Georgia also used the funds to counteract disinformation, issuing public service announcements warning voters of disinformation and encouraging them to report fraud to the Secretary of State hotline. (emphasis added)

The two Zuckerberg-funded nonprofits spent four times more per Georgia resident than they did per resident of the other 49 states combined –$4.76 per resident of Georgia ($51 million/10.7 million residents), compared to $1.15 per resident of all 49 other states combined ($368 million/323.4 million residents).

This extraordinarily high level of per resident spending in Georgia by CTCL and CEIR–a state in which the Democratic candidate for president, Joe Biden, was certified the winner over former President Donald Trump by a margin of less than 12,000 votes in the November 3, 2020 election, and where two Democratic Senate candidates narrowly defeated two incumbent Republican Senators in the January 5, 2021 runoff elections–adds more support to claims that the efforts of both CTCL and CEIR were partisan Democrat Get-0ut-the-vote efforts and not attempts to assist the administration of elections in a fair and nonpartisan way.

“We always believed that Zuckerberg is wise enough to know how to use $400 million to accomplish his objectives. Now the evidence is demonstrating this to be true, that Zuckerberg’s design was to put Mr. Biden in the White House,” Phill Kline, the director of the Amistad Project of the Thomas More Society, told Breitbart News in an exclusive interview.

In December, the Amistad Project released a scathing report of the impact of Zuckerberg’s private funding of election administration on the outcome of the 2020 presidential election, as Breitbart News reported:

A report released by the Amistad Project of the Thomas More Society at a press conference on Wednesday alleged Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife made $419.5 million in contributions to non-profit organizations during the 2020 election cycle–$350 million to the “Safe Elections” Project of the Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL) and another $69.5 million to the Center for Election Innovation and Research–that, “improperly influence[d] the 2020 presidential election on behalf of one particular candidate and party.”

“The 2020 presidential election witnessed an unprecedented and coordinated public-private partnership to improperly influence the 2020 presidential election on behalf of one particular candidate and party. Funded by hundreds of millions of dollars from Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and other high-tech interests, activist organizations created a two-tiered election system that treated voters differently depending on whether they lived in Democrat or Republican strongholds,” Amistad Project Director Phill Kline wrote in the report’s executive summary.

The report identified three key actions that, taken together, “represent the beginning of the formation of a two-tier election system favoring one demographic while disadvantaging another demographic.”

  • Private monies dictated city and county election management contrary to both federal law and state election plans endorsed and developed by state legislatures with authority granted by the United States Constitution.

  • Executive officials in swing states facilitated, through unique and novel contracts, the sharing of private and sensitive information about citizens within those states with private interests, some whom actively promote leftist candidates and agendas.

  • Swing state governors also started issuing emergency executive orders shutting down in-person voting while pouring new state resources into encouraging persons to vote in advance. Polling data revealed this coordinated assault on in-person voting generally favored Democrat Party voters who preferred to vote in advance, while placing Republicans, who preferred to vote in person, at a disadvantage. These actions represent the beginning of the formation of a two-tier election system favoring one demographic while disadvantaging another demographic.

The May 2021 an FGA report stated that the CTCL grants in Georgia “had and impact . . . on how [the 2020 election] turned out:

CTCL distributed hundreds of millions in “Zuckerbucks” to thousands of election jurisdictions in 48 states and Washington, D.C. These funds were pitched as “COVID-19 response grants” intended to simply assist election officials in the safe conduct of elections. However, the reality is much different. From Iowa to Florida, the infusion of Zuckerbucks into Democrat-leaning jurisdictions influenced the outcome of the 2020 presidential election. Indeed, much of the Zuckerbucks were not even spent on COVID-19 related expenses—with states reporting expenditures on advertising, vehicle purchases, registering teenagers to vote, and other nonCOVID-related items.

The pivotal state of Georgia was one of the biggest targets of these funds, ultimately receiving one of the largest allocations of Zuckerbucks in the nation. Unfortunately, these grants had an impact on not only the way the election was conducted, but also on how it turned out.

Georgia was not the only battleground state that received significant funding from CTCL and CEIR in 2020. Six other states received an estimated total of $119 million from CTCL and CEIR.

Pennsylvania, which Biden narrowly won, received $35.2 million from CTCL ($22 million) and CEIR ($13.2 million). Michigan, which Biden also narrowly won, received $19.5 million from CTCL ($7.6 million) and CEIR ($11.9 million). Arizona, which Biden won by less than 11,000 votes, received about $9.7 million from CTCL($5 million) and CEIR ($4.7 million). Florida, which Trump won by three percent, received $12.4 million from CTCL ($12.2 million) and CEIR ($0.2 million).

CTCL spent $6.3 million in Wisconsin, which Biden narrowly won by less than 21,000 votes, and $36 million in Texas, which Trump won by five percent.

All told, seven key battleground states received a combined total of $170 million from CTCL and CEIR during the 2020 election cycle, while the remaining 43 states and the District of Columbia received $249 million.

On Saturday, the Georgia Republican Party Convention censured Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, also a Republican, for “dereliction of constitutional duty” for the manner in which he oversaw the 2020 general election and the 2021 runoff election.

More Stories
Chuck Grassley Presses State Department for Additional Information on John Kerry’s Financial Disclosures